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Will this be the century – the millennium – of women?

 Hillary Clinton delivering a speech to the United Nations Fourth World Congress in Beijing in 1995, in which she famously said, “human rights are women’s rights, and women’s rights are human rights.” Photo credit: Sharon Farmer/The White House.

Hillary Clinton delivering a speech to the United Nations Fourth World Congress in Beijing in 1995, in which she famously said, “human rights are women’s rights, and women’s rights are human rights.” Photo credit: Sharon Farmer/The White House.

I boldly predicted to a publicist-friend the other day that Theresa May would be the last man standing, so to speak, in the Brexit scandal and become the new PM. I also believe Hillary Clinton will be the next president and Elizabeth Warren, her secretary of state.

You never want to make bold predictions, because they have a way of not coming true. But what is clear is that we’ve been moving toward an era of greater female political power and why not? As Brexit continues to demonstrate, there’s nothing quite like a man when it comes to mucking things up. And women – bless their little detail-loving hearts – would seem better-suited to the day-to-day nitty-gritty of governance.

Perhaps more important, they’re less likely to let their egos get in the way of doing a job.

Women, however, are not without their pitfalls, including their chief Achilles’ heel – men.

Witness email-gate in which President Bill Clinton just happened to be chatting with Attorney General Loretta Lynch at an airport – for a half-hour no less – as Lynch’s Justice Department investigates any wrongdoing in Secretary of State Clinton’s failure to keep separate email accounts for private and professional correspondence.

One of the cardinal rules of journalism is that the appearance of impropriety is as bad as impropriety itself. It hardly matters if Bill Clinton and Lynch were discussing grandkids, as she said. She’s A.G., he’s the spouse of a candidate being investigated by the A.G.’s office, you say “hi” and “bye” in public or avoid the situation altogether.

Hillary Clinton has long since proved she can stand on her own accomplishments. She’s been a lawyer, a senator from New York and secretary of state. Now she’s the first woman to be the presumptive nominee of a major political party in U.S. history. Like many women, she’s probably overqualified for the job she’s seeking.

But also like many women, who like to multitask, she blurs the lines between the personal and the professional. When she’s gotten into trouble as a candidate, as we saw in her 2008 campaign, it’s when she unwittingly reminded us that she is also Bill Clinton’s wife.

Behind-the-scenes, he can be her greatest asset. On the front lines, the passion that makes him so charismatically volatile undercuts her less charismatic but consistent capability.

She needs to keep “the Big Dog” on a very short leash.